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Tuesday, May 15, 2018

False positives in antivirus software

So last week we had a low-level inquiry from a company wanting to migrate MDaemon calendars to Office 365.

They'd already tried the arduous PST method and found it wanting.

So we set them up with a trial version of the migration software.  Next thing we heard from them was that TrendMicro AV was flagging it as containing ransomware.

Seriously?

Like, how realistic is it for us to send out ransomware when we maintain a blog going back to 2005 (you're on it), a public web site, a Twitter account, and we give you our direct email addresses?

A quick search in the spirit of JFGI for "false positives antivirus" gives some insight.



So this is not just something that is affecting us.

We can understand your caution.  We in fact encourage your skepticism and welcome your desire to challenge us.  Anyone who's been through our various doc sets for migrations knows that we promote planning and preparation.

Since our code works on Exchange / Office 365 servers it is by definition server-modifying, so I can understand how detection algorithms could get wary.

Keep in mind, though that Sumatra Development is one of the few companies you deal with where if you're not talking to the people who wrote your migration code you're only one degree of separation away from the person who did.



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